Aquarium Care

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Posts Tagged ‘Fins’

Look To Make Sure That You Are Buying Disease Free Fish At Pet Store

A home aquarium is a thing of beauty, and can add interest to a room. It does require a bit of maintenance to ensure that the tanks occupants are all healthy. It is essential to make sure that you are buying healthy fish at pet store, as if you introduce an unhealthy fish to your aquarium, the disease could spread to everyone else.

Pick a decent pet store to buy your fish from. Examine the tanks when you go in, and ask yourself if it looks immaculately clean and well cared for. Staff should be anxious to help you, and knowledgeable about their stock. You really need to be an enthusiast to work in a pet store.

The fish tanks should look clean and fresh, and should not smell. All the fish should look alert and healthy, and their colors bright. Their fins should be pointing up and should be rigid and not floppy. Fish that look as if they have been bitten by others could be feeling ill, and unable to protect themselves.

Take a close look at the fish you want, as the body should be all nicely proportioned and not bulging out weirdly. There should not be any kind of lumps or bumps, or discolored spots. The gills should be a healthy pink and respiration normal. The fish should be happy to interact with others and not afraid or stressed.

Make sure you are buying fish with the correct temperament for your tank. If you have a nice peaceful tank full of community fish then take care not to add anyone too aggressive. They will not calm down in time, but are more likely to attack your fish.

When you get your new fish home, open the lid of the tank and let the bag just rest on the top of the water. This gives new fish a chance to calm down before being introduced to their new home. It also gives the water in the bag time to reach the same temperature as the water in the tank, avoiding any shock to the fish. This should take twenty minutes or so, after which time they can be let out.

Aquariums can take a bit of time to properly maintain, as water will need partial changing, filters have to be checked and glass cleaned. You may find that the water gets cloudy every so often for no good reason. This is normal but annoying. EcoBio-Blocks are a good addition as they can help the water to clear and cut down on general maintenance time each week.

EcoBio-Blocks are made out of a kind of porous stone which is of volcanic origin. The stone contains many minerals and bacteria which are beneficial to the tank and the fish. The bacteria will act to get water clean and sparkling, and will keep it that way. Your fish will have a much healthier environment and will be easy to see. There will also be no odor in the tank.

Fish tanks can make a great focal point for a room, and are worth the effort that they take to set up and maintain. It is worth making the effort of buying healthy fish at the pet store that will live long and happy lives. Most tanks once they are set-up, will require only a short amount of time each week to maintain, especially if you have solved the problem of cloudy water.

Looking for more information on how to keep fish healthy in your fish tank? Get the lowdown now at complete EcoBio-Block review.

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Sticky: Aquarium Care: Daily, Weekly, Monthly

Healthy tank with EcoBio-Stone

Healthy tank with EcoBio-Stone

An aquarium is an ongoing responsibility and requires daily attention, though if you keep up with the regular maintenance it is quite easy and doesn’t take much time. There are additional maintenance procedures required with various conditions, but here are a few things that must be done in every aquarium regardless of other factors.

Daily Maintenance

While fish do not necessarily need to be fed daily to be healthy due to their opportunistic eating habits and specialized metabolism, they do need to be checked daily and this is best done during feeding. Feed at a time that you have a few minutes to observe your fish and watch carefully for any abnormal behavior or signs of illness. What are you looking for? A healthy fish should be free of any marks, especially red or white marks that can suggest infection or parasites, should not struggle to swim in any way and should not have fins clamped down.

Watch the fish eat to ensure all are active, move easily in the water, and their fins are up. If you notice ragged edges on any fins there may be fish in the aquarium getting picked on, or the fish may be getting their fins caught on rough edges on decorations or artificial plants. If the aquarium is fairly new or new fish have recently been added, watch closely for redness or puffiness around the gills that may indicate ammonia in the water. If any abnormalities are observed, test your water parameters first and if they are within acceptable limits research other possible causes.

If desired, wipe down the outside of the aquarium with a damp cloth every day to remove fingerprints and dust. Never use any chemicals such as Windex near the aquarium as even the slightest trace of such products will kill the fish.

Weekly Maintenance

Depending on your stocking levels, you will need to do a partial water change every week or every other week. This is to keep nitrate levels down and keep essential dissolved minerals at a healthy level for the fish. These water changes generally need to be between 30-50% of the total water volume. In a newer tank that is still cycling or if new fish have just been added, water changes may also be needed to control ammonia and nitrites, though it will likely be more often than once a week for that purpose. For a healthier tank and a significantly reduced risk of ammonia spikes, you can use a time-released water maintenance product such as EcoBio-Block. These blocks last up to two years apiece and keep the water in the aquarium perfectly balanced by breaking down the toxic ammonia and nitrites from fish waste and uneaten food, as well as re-supplying essential minerals in the water as they’re used up by the fish which dramatically reduces the need for water changes.

Algae grow regularly in aquariums and, if visible on underwater surfaces, should be manually scraped off with a scraper sponge that is approved specifically for aquariums. A sponge that is not specifically for an aquarium may scratch glass and acrylic and may have been manufactured with chemicals that are harmful to fish. Filter pads should be rinsed out in a dish of aquarium water to remove excess organic material and then placed back in the filter. Tap water should never be used as the filter pad contains a lot of beneficial bacteria that will die if exposed to chlorine or chloramines, which are removed in tank water with a de-chlorinating water treatment. Top off the water to replace any that has evaporated and the amount used to rinse out the filter pad.

Monthly Maintenance

Every month the aquarium needs a thorough gravel vacuum to remove organic material such as uneaten food and fish waste from the substrate, as well as remove potentially harmful pockets of gasses that can build up in the substrate over time if it is not stirred. If you use EcoBio-Block in the aquarium then you need only stir the substrate manually once or twice a month to help excess organic material get into the filter where it can easily be removed from the system through rinsing filter pads, which can save a lot of time, effort and mess over a traditional gravel vacuum.

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