Aquarium Care

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Posts Tagged ‘Community Fish’

Choosing The Best Fish For A Beginner’s Aquarium

community fish tank

Community fish tank

If a person decides to join the many who find enjoyment from keeping fish as pets, they should put some effort into becoming informed about the best fish for a beginner’s aquarium. There are important differences in how to go about this depending upon whether one is using an existing set up or creating an environment for new pets. There are many types which are practical choices for the novice owner of these diverse aquatic creatures. As the piscean enthusiast becomes more experienced, many become devoted collectors and continue to add new varieties to their stock.

The typical beginner’s first notion may be to go with the type with which most are familiar, the common goldfish. Some may be aware that this variety was first bred as pets for the Imperial Chinese family. Many are less knowledgeable of the fact that goldfish are not necessarily the easiest to care for.

Many varieties of these pets are suitable for thriving in a tank, yet the problems associated with raising different breeds ranges from simple to quite complex. So there are many factors a novice at this hobby should consider, such as how well a breed tolerates water conditions. Other important considerations are, how easy a chosen type is to feed, how large they will grow, and whether or not they are too aggressive to live with other species.

One of the mistakes made by many newcomers is to start with too small of a tank. The less the volume of water, the bigger the impact any change in water quality will have on the creatures which live in it. Another concern is that the water in a new tank can contain harmful chemicals or minerals that may harm its denizens, the best and easiest way to keep water clear and healthy is to use EcoBio-Block, a volcanic mixture with beneficial bacteria living and multiplying in the block. It creates a healthy ecosystem by keeping levels of good bacteria high.

A common error for beginners is to add too many fish to a new tank. A good rule of thumb is to start with no more than two or three fish, so that the proper levels of chemicals and bacteria for a healthy environment are reached. EcoBio-Block can also speed-up new tank syndrome. The next step is to choose the correct types of occupants for the tank.

Good types to initially stock one’s tank with are schooling fish, those that travel in schools. Common types of these are Cyprinids, smaller species that are related to Minnows and Carp. The many varieties of these include Barbs, Danios, Rasboras, and White Cloud Mountain Minnows.

Certain breeds of Catfish, known as Corys, which include Bronze, Panda, Bandit and Spotted Corys, are hardy animals which are fairly easy to care for. Another popular type for the novice are Rainbowfish, which are colorful schoolers that are best kept in groups of six or more, yet are easy to raise.

By starting in moderation and slowly adding more as the hobbyist’s knowledge increases, choosing the best fish for a beginner’s aquarium is not difficult. Once a little experience and success with one’s initial choices has been achieved, many budding aquarists will want to add more varieties and larger tanks as they do research and gain experience.

 

 

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Look To Make Sure That You Are Buying Disease Free Fish At Pet Store

A home aquarium is a thing of beauty, and can add interest to a room. It does require a bit of maintenance to ensure that the tanks occupants are all healthy. It is essential to make sure that you are buying healthy fish at pet store, as if you introduce an unhealthy fish to your aquarium, the disease could spread to everyone else.

Pick a decent pet store to buy your fish from. Examine the tanks when you go in, and ask yourself if it looks immaculately clean and well cared for. Staff should be anxious to help you, and knowledgeable about their stock. You really need to be an enthusiast to work in a pet store.

The fish tanks should look clean and fresh, and should not smell. All the fish should look alert and healthy, and their colors bright. Their fins should be pointing up and should be rigid and not floppy. Fish that look as if they have been bitten by others could be feeling ill, and unable to protect themselves.

Take a close look at the fish you want, as the body should be all nicely proportioned and not bulging out weirdly. There should not be any kind of lumps or bumps, or discolored spots. The gills should be a healthy pink and respiration normal. The fish should be happy to interact with others and not afraid or stressed.

Make sure you are buying fish with the correct temperament for your tank. If you have a nice peaceful tank full of community fish then take care not to add anyone too aggressive. They will not calm down in time, but are more likely to attack your fish.

When you get your new fish home, open the lid of the tank and let the bag just rest on the top of the water. This gives new fish a chance to calm down before being introduced to their new home. It also gives the water in the bag time to reach the same temperature as the water in the tank, avoiding any shock to the fish. This should take twenty minutes or so, after which time they can be let out.

Aquariums can take a bit of time to properly maintain, as water will need partial changing, filters have to be checked and glass cleaned. You may find that the water gets cloudy every so often for no good reason. This is normal but annoying. EcoBio-Blocks are a good addition as they can help the water to clear and cut down on general maintenance time each week.

EcoBio-Blocks are made out of a kind of porous stone which is of volcanic origin. The stone contains many minerals and bacteria which are beneficial to the tank and the fish. The bacteria will act to get water clean and sparkling, and will keep it that way. Your fish will have a much healthier environment and will be easy to see. There will also be no odor in the tank.

Fish tanks can make a great focal point for a room, and are worth the effort that they take to set up and maintain. It is worth making the effort of buying healthy fish at the pet store that will live long and happy lives. Most tanks once they are set-up, will require only a short amount of time each week to maintain, especially if you have solved the problem of cloudy water.

Looking for more information on how to keep fish healthy in your fish tank? Get the lowdown now at complete EcoBio-Block review.

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Looking for the Right Fish for Your Aquarium

So you want to get an aquarium. Your first step is to figure out what kind of fish you want. But just how do you choose from the colorful tanks on the wall of your local pet store?

This can be a daunting experience for new fish keepers. Of course, you want fish that appeal to you and have the right ‘look,’ but when selecting fish for your new aquarium, there are three important questions to keep in mind. First, how large will this fish grow? Second, what are the fish’s water quality requirements? Finally, how well will this fish live with the other fish I want?

Some fish will stay small, say an inch or less. These are generally considered community fish. Many fishkeepers select a group of similar community fish to fill their tank. Good choices for tropical community fish include guppies, swordtails, Platies, and dwarf Gourami. When selecting these varieties, choose fish that are about the same size, and avoid mixing different varieties unless you have been advised that they will get along well together. Never purchase just one community fish; they are used to swimming in schools, and will get lonely in your aquarium. A good rule of thumb for this size of fish is one inch of fish for one gallon of aquarium water.

The other kinds of fishes can mature to much bigger sizes, anywhere from 6 inches to several feet. These kinds of fish should be kept solitary for they usually show aggression to other fish that are smaller or weaker. When choosing one of these bigger fish you will need an appropriately sized aquarium. While it is possible to house them in a 10-gallon tank, it must be upgraded to a bigger size once they mature to adult size.

It will be better to just purchase the aquarium that can accommodate their adult size, when you first get your fish. Once you’ve selected the kind of fish you want, find out the maximum size they will grow to, then buy the appropriate aquarium.

There are some varieties of fish that will survive almost any water condition. A popular example of these is the goldfish. They have a reputation for being almost invincible. They will most likely flourish even without lighting or filter, but this is not good aquarium practice.

The slightly more picky tropical fish need a narrower water temperature range, as well as high-quality water. To achieve the water quality these fish need, test your water frequently, use a good filter on the aquarium, and consider products like the EcoBio-Block, which improves your aquarium water quality and reduces maintenance. Some fish need a specific pH, or have other water quality requirements. Be sure to do your research so that the fish you choose have similar water requirements.

The last category of fish includes saltwater or marine varieties. These are tricky to keep, and are best left until you have fishkeeping experience with freshwater fish. In addition to temperature, light, and water quality requirements, you must also keep an eye on the salt levels in the aquarium. These beautiful fish require a lot of work to keep them healthy, and you cannot mix freshwater fish with saltwater varieties.

Lastly, whatever the species you decide on, always remember to buy only those fish that are healthy. Inspect them carefully for uneven scales, irregular growth or injuries. Check also if they have bright eyes and intact fins. They should have healthy appetites and move actively and naturally in the water.

The fish you eventually choose for your aquarium will bring you many happy days of living nature experiences that are guaranteed to reduce your stress and give comfort and beauty to your home or office.

Leonard Boyler has been keeping fish for more than 20 years. His favorite products make aquarium care and maintenance very easy from start up to clearing up cloudy aquariums. To learn more about how to clear up your water and have healthy fish please visit ONEdersave.com.

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Aquarium Care Series: Feeding Basics

by Ruby Bayan, OurSimpleJoys.com

girl-feedingsProviding your fish with the right types of food at the right time is crucial. For your pet fish to flourish in their captive environment, they need to assimilate nutrients that are identical to those found in their natural habitat.

Fortunately, different types of fish food, packed with necessary minerals and nutrients, and prepared in various forms, are commercially available. With your knowledge of your specific fishes’ nutritional and feeding requirements, and the help of your nearest well-stocked pet food store, your fish communities can enjoy the diets essential to their health, appearance, and life span.

Feeding Principles

There are several basic principles you need to remember when feeding aquarium fish. By following the feeding tips related to these principles, you can rest assured that your fish community will remain in an equilibrium and in optimum health.

  1. Each specie of fish has unique food and feeding requirements. Carnivores will need plenty of protein — from meat slivers or small fish. Herbivores will require adequate fiber — from plants and algae. Some species appreciate chasing live food like insects and worms.
    Tip: Research on the food requirements and feeding habits of each breed of fish you keep. Then inspect the different types of food commercially available. This will help you determine which types of food you need to stock up on.
  2. Overfeeding can be hazardous to your fish community. Fish can only eat as much as their stomachs will allow. Typically, fishes are able to swallow their one-meal intake within three to five minutes from the time the food is introduced into the tank. After that, the leftovers will remain suspended in the water and start to decay, polluting the environment. Not even the most efficient filtration system can counteract a heavily contaminated setup.
    Tip: Feed the fish a little at a time, at regular intervals during the day, instead of dropping one “big meal” into the tank. To help minimize accidental pollution and maintain a clear and healthy environment for the fish, consider incorporating a water-conditioning product in your set-up like the EcoBio-Block.
  3. Fish can also get obese — another consequence of overfeeding. Some breeds of fish (like cyclids and catfish) are prone to non-stop eating, giving way to obesity and poor health. Fish food that are too fatty (like Whiteworms) should be given sparingly.
    Tip: Be aware of this obesity phenomenon and feed only the quantity and quality of food that will ensure good health and nutrition.
  4. Sometimes not all the fish are able to eat properly. In a community tank, fast swimmers and hyperactive fish will get to the food sooner than the rest. Juveniles will be more picky than adults. Nocturnals will only eat when it’s dark. Surface feeders will only eat food that are floating; bottom feeders will only eat food that have sunk. A new fish may be too shy to approach the food, and sick ones will simply ignore the feedings.
    Tip: Observe all the fish during feeding time. Ensure that all of them are able to eat properly and adequately.
  5. Fish appreciate variety in their diets. Feeding your fish the same food for months at a time can lead to some form of malnutrition. In their native habitats, fish obtain a variety of foods, so this is what you should strive to simulate.
    Tip: Vary the types of food you give your fish community — through a mixture or alternation of prepared foods (dried and frozen), live foods, and greens, for a balance of carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, and minerals.
  6. Live or fresh foods, though nutritious and preferred by most fishes can be risky. Worms, insect larvae, water fleas, and brine shrimp are just some of the live foods that most fish enjoy chasing and gobbling up. Unfortunately, introducing these tasty delights into your aquarium poses the risk of introducing disease-carrying bacteria or accompanying predators (leeches and diving beetles) as well.
    Tip: Always rinse live and fresh food under clean running water to remove dirt and dead ones. Culture your own batches, if possible, to avoid harvesting unwanted predators. And scoop out the uneaten ones after each meal because they will eventually die and pollute the water.

Nutritional Requirements

In order to understand what types of foods are essential for your fish, here’s a rundown of the different nutrients that are crucial for fish health and longevity:

  1. Proteins – About 50 percent of the total calorie requirement of fish come from proteins. Amino acids, the building blocks of muscles, cells, and tissue are essential, especially for juvenile fish.
  2. Carbohydrates – More required by freshwater fish than marine fish, carbohydrates are also necessary for energy and growth.
  3. Fatty Acids – The major energy source for most fish, fats are stored in their tissues to provide stamina and serve as storage medium for fat soluble vitamins A, D, E, and K.
  4. Minerals – Abundant sources of minerals exist for fishes in their natural habitat. In an aquarium, fishes will need prepared food fortified with minerals (like calcium for their bone formation).
  5. Vitamins – The essential vitamins your fish need are: A (from greens and crustaceans), B-Complex (from greens, eggs, and yeast), C (from greens, algae, and fish eggs), D (from snails, shrimps, and earthworms), E (from algae, greens, and egg yolk), and K (from water fleas, greens, and liver).
  6. Fiber – Also a necessary diet component for fish, fiber is abundant in vegetable matter.

 

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